Procedure for Selection and Use of Personal Protective Equipment1

Government of the Republic Regulation  of 11 January 2000

entered into force 24 January 2000.

 

This Regulation is established on the basis of subsection 3 (5) of the Occupational Health and Safety Act (RT I 1999, 60, 616).

 

§ 1. Scope of application

(1) This procedure applies to all fields of activity within the scope of application of the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

(2) This procedure provides the conditions for the selection and use of protective equipment and any additions and accessories thereto intended for the personal use of workers, including clothing specifically designed to protect workers against hazards likely to endanger their safety and health at work.

(3) For the purposes of this procedure, the following are not deemed to be personal protective equipment:

1) ordinary working clothes and uniforms;

2) equipment used by emergency and rescue services;

3) personal protective equipment worn or used by the military, the police and other public order agencies;

4) sports equipment;

5) personal protective equipment for means of transport;

6) self-defence or deterrent equipment;

7) portable devices for detecting risks.

 

§ 2. General requirements and obligations

(1) The employer is required to provide personal protective equipment to workers when safety and health risks present at the workplace cannot be avoided or sufficiently limited by technical means of collective protection or by measures, methods or procedures of work.

(2) The employer shall take the necessary measures to ensure that personal protective equipment meets the general requirements for health protection and safety and that the procurement of such equipment is guided by the principles laid down in § 3.

(3) The employer shall provide personal protective equipment free of charge and organise the necessary maintenance and cleaning thereof at the expense of the employer.

(4) The employer shall make sure that all personal protective equipment:

1) fully meets the need for protection;

2) does not require excessive physical effort on the part of the user and does not reduce the effect of any device worn by the user to correct his or her sight or hearing;

3) fits the wearer correctly;

4) corresponds to existing conditions at the workplace;

5) complies with ergonomic requirements and corresponds to the worker's state of health.

(5) Where the presence of more than one risk makes it necessary for a worker to wear simultaneously more than one item of personal protective equipment, such equipment shall be compatible.

(6) The employer is required to:

1) ensure that provision is made at the workplace for facilities for the storage and maintenance of personal protective equipment;

2) keep record of the items of personal protective equipment issued to workers;

3) repair or replace, at the employer’s expense, any item of personal protective equipment which becomes unfit for use before the end of its working life;

4) take the necessary measures to ensure that personal protective equipment issued to workers is in good working condition and clean and that it is regularly inspected and maintained in accordance with the instructions supplied by the manufacturer;

5) arrange for training for workers and, if appropriate, organise demonstrations in the wearing of personal protective equipment, and to inform the workers of the risks against which the wearing of the personal protective equipment protects them;

6) organise, pursuant to the Waste Act (RT I 1998, 57, 861; 1999, 23, 353), the handling of personal protective equipment with a best-before date which has passed or which has become unfit for use due to any other reason and the handling of the exchangeable parts of equipment which have become contaminated;

7) indicate danger zones where the use of personal protective equipment is mandatory by appropriate safety signs.

(7) Workers shall maintain personal protective equipment in good working condition and inform the employer or the representative of the employer of any breakdowns of or shortcomings related to the personal protective equipment.

(8) Working environment representatives are required to monitor that workers are provided with appropriate personal protective equipment which is in good working order.

(9) Persons responsible for the design of construction works and the development of work technologies shall take the requirements for occupational health and safety into account hygiene with the aim of minimising the need for personal protective equipment. Where the use of personal protective equipment is still necessary, the designer shall prescribe the types of personal protective equipment to be used and provide the procedure for the use thereof.

 

§ 3. Assessment and selection of personal protective equipment

(1) Before choosing personal protective equipment, the employer is required to analyse and subsequently assess the risks which are present in the working environment and which cannot be avoided by other means than by using personal protective equipment.

(2) After the risks have been identified, the need for protection shall be assessed and the characteristics which personal protective equipment must have in order to be effective against the risks shall be determined.

(3) When selecting personal protective equipment, the employer shall ensure that the equipment meets the requirements provided in subsections 2 (4) and (5). The employer shall also take into account the risks and other influences which the equipment itself may create.

(4) The assessment shall be reviewed if any changes are made to the working environment or to any other factors which may influence the assessment.

(5) The specimen table provided for in Annex 1 may be used as a guideline upon the survey of the risks present at the workplace and upon selection of appropriate personal protective equipment.

(6) A non-exhaustive guide list of items of personal protective equipment is provided in Annex 2.

 

§ 4. Use of personal protective equipment

(1) The employer shall ensure that personal protective equipment is used in compliance with the instructions supplied by the manufacturer and that it is used from the commencement of dangerous work until the completion of the work, and shall monitor its use.

(2) The conditions of use of personal protective equipment, in particular the period for which it is worn, shall be determined on the basis of the seriousness of the risk, the frequency of exposure to the risk, the characteristics of the workstation of each worker and the performance of the personal protective equipment.

(3) Workers are required to use personal protective equipment in compliance with the user manual and the instructions provided by the employer.

(4) When organising work, the employer shall take into account the additional physical or mental stress which the use of personal protective equipment may cause to workers and, where necessary, prescribe breaks, restrictions on use or other such measures to maintain the workers’ capacity for work.

(5) Personal protective equipment is, in principle, intended for personal use. If the circumstances require personal protective equipment to be worn by more than one worker, the employer shall take appropriate measures to ensure that such use does not create any health or hygiene problem for the different users.

(6) A non-exhaustive guide list of activities and sectors of activity which may require the provision of personal protective equipment is provided in Annex 3.

 

§ 5. Consultation of workers

The employer shall consult the workers and working environment representatives on matters related to the selection of personal protective equipment and determination of the conditions for the use thereof.

 

1 Directive 89/656/EEC (OJ L 393, 30.12.1989, p. 75) of the Council of the European Communities.

 

Annex 1 to the Procedure for Selection and Use of Personal Protective Equipment

 

Specimen table for risk survey and selection of personal protective equipment

 

Parts of the body

Head

Cranium

Ears

Eyes

Respiratory tract

Face

Whole head

Upper limbs

Hands

Arms

Lower limbs

Feet

Legs

Various

Skin

Trunk/abdomen

Gastro-intestinal tract

Parenteral passages

Whole body

 

Risk factors

 

Physical

Mechanical

Falls from a height

Blows, crushing

Stabs, cuts, grazes

Vibration

Slipping, falling over

Thermal

Heat, fire

Cold

Electrical

 

Radiation

Non-ionising

Ionising

Noise

 

Chemical

Aerosols

Dust, fibres

Fumes

Vapours

Liquids

Immersion

Splashes, spurts

Gases, vapours

 

Biological

 

Harmful bacteria

Harmful viruses

Mycotic fungi

Non-microbe biological antigens

 

  Annex 2 to the Procedure for Selection and Use of Personal Protective Equipment

 

Non-exhaustive guide list of items of personal protective equipment

 

Head protection

Protective helmets (mines, building sites, other industrial and forestry uses)

Scalp protection (caps, bonnets, hairnets, etc.)

Protective headgear (bonnets, caps, sou'westers, etc. in fabric, fabric with proofing, etc.)

Hearing protection

Earplugs and similar devices

Earmuffs

Earmuffs which can be fitted to industrial helmets

Full acoustic helmets

Ear protection with intercom equipment

Eye and face protection

Spectacles

Goggles

X-ray goggles, laser-beam goggles, ultra-violet, infra-red, visible radiation goggles

Face shields

Arc-welding masks and helmets (hand masks, headband masks or masks which can be fitted to protective helmets)

Respiratory protection

Dust filters, gas filters and radioactive dust filters

Insulating appliances with an air supply

Respiratory devices including a removable welding mask

Diving equipment

Diving suits

Hand and arm protection

Gloves to provide protection from machinery and equipment (piercing, cuts, vibrations, etc.)

Gloves to provide protection from chemicals and from heat

Gloves to provide protection for electricians

Mittens

Finger stalls

Over-sleeves

Wrist protection for heavy work

Fingerless gloves

Protective gloves

Foot and leg protection

Low shoes, ankle boots, calf length boots, safety boots

Shoes which can be unlaced or unhooked rapidly

Vibration resistant shoes, boots and over-boots

Shoes and overshoes with heat resistant soles

Thermal shoes, boots and over-boots

Shoes and boots with pierce-proof soles

Thermal shoes, boots and over-boots

Vibration resistant shoes, boots and over-boots

Anti-static shoes, boots and over-boots

Protective boots for chain saw operators

Clogs

Removable instep protectors

Gaiters

Removable soles (heatproof, pierce-proof or sweat-proof)

Removable spikes for ice, snow or slippery flooring

Kneepads

Work trousers with safety features (for use in forestry work)

Skin protection

Barrier creams/ointments

Trunk and abdomen protection

Protective waistcoats, jackets and aprons to provide protection from machinery and equipment (piercing, cutting, molten metal splashes, etc.)

Protective waistcoats, jackets and aprons to provide protection from chemicals

Heated waistcoats

Life jackets

Protective X-ray aprons

Body belts

Whole body protection

Equipment designed to prevent falls

Fall prevention equipment (full equipment with all necessary accessories)

Braking equipment to absorb kinetic energy (full equipment with all necessary accessories)

Body holding devices (safety harness)

Protective clothing

'Safety' working clothing (two-piece and overalls)

Clothing to provide protection from machinery and equipment (piercing, cutting, molten metal splashes, infra-red radiation, etc.)

Clothing to provide protection from chemicals, heat resistant clothing, dust-proof clothing and gas-proof clothing

Thermal clothing

Clothing to provide protection from radioactive contamination

Fluorescent signalling, retro-reflecting clothing and accessories (armbands, gloves, reflector bands, etc.)

Protective coverings

 

Annex 3 to the Procedure for Selection and Use of Personal Protective Equipment

 

Non-exhaustive guide list of activities and sectors of activity which may require the provision of personal protective equipment

 

Head protection

Protective helmets

Building work, particularly work on, underneath or in the vicinity of scaffolding and elevated workplaces, erection and stripping of form-work, assembly and installation work, work on scaffolding, and other installation and demolition work

Work on steel bridges, steel building construction, masts, towers, steel hydraulic structures, steel works, rolling mills, boiler plants and power stations, large containers and large pipelines

Work in underground workings, quarries, open diggings, shafts and tunnels

Earth and rock works

Work with bolt-driving tools

Blasting work

Work in the vicinity of lifts, lifting gear, cranes and conveyors

Work with blast furnaces, direct reduction plants, steelworks, metal casting, rolling, forming and forging

Shipbuilding

Railway shunting work

Slaughterhouses

Felling of timber

Foot protection

Safety shoes with puncture proof soles

Roadworks

Work on construction sites (scaffolding work, work with concrete, installation of prefabricated parts, formwork erection and stripping)

Roof work

Safety shoes without pierce-proof soles

Work on steel bridges, steel building construction, masts, towers, steel hydraulic structures, steel works, rolling mills, boiler plants, power stations, cranes, large containers and large pipelines

Furnace construction, heating and ventilation installation and metal assembly work

Work with blast furnaces, direct reduction plants, steelworks, metal casting, cold and hot working of metals

Work in underground workings, quarries, open diggings, shafts and tunnels

Earth and rock works

Flat glass products and container glassware manufacture

Work with moulds in the ceramics industry

Moulding work in the ceramic ware and building materials industry

 

Lining of kilns in the ceramics industry

Transport and storage

Work with frozen meat blocks and handling of preserved foods

Shipbuilding

Railway shunting work

Felling of timber

Drilling work

Safety shoes with heels or wedges and pierce-proof soles

Roof work

Protective shoes with insulated soles

Work with and on very hot or very cold materials

Safety shoes which can easily be removed

Where there is a risk of penetration by molten substances

Eye and face protection

Protective goggles, face shields or screens

Welding

Forging, grinding, drilling, turning and milling

Rock working and processing

Work with bolt-driving tools

Work with nail guns

Spraying of abrasive substances and liquids

Work with acids and caustic solutions, disinfectants and corrosive cleaning products

Work with and in the vicinity of molten substances

Work with radiant heat

Work with lasers

Blasting operations

Other work involving a risk of damage to the eyes or face

Respiratory protection

Filters, respirators and other breathing apparatus

Work in containers, restricted areas and gas-fired industrial furnaces where there may be gas or insufficient oxygen

Work in the vicinity of the blast furnace charge

Work in the vicinity of gas converters and blast furnace gas pipes

Work in the vicinity of blast furnace taps where there may be heavy metal fumes

Work on the lining of furnaces and ladles where there may be dust

 

Spray painting where dedusting is inadequate

Work in shafts, sewers and other underground areas connected with sewage

Work in refrigeration plants where there is a danger that the refrigerant may escape

Work with asbestos

Work involving carcinogens

Work involving benzene and lead

Hearing protection

Ear protectors

Work with metal presses

Work with pneumatic drills or hammers

Pile driving work

Blasting operations

Wood and textile working

Work with bolt-driving tools and nail guns

Other work where the noise level is higher than 85 dB(A)

Body, hand and arm protection

Protective clothing

Work with acids and caustic solutions, disinfectants and corrosive cleaning products

Work with or in the vicinity of hot materials and where the effects of heat are felt

Work on flat glass products

Shot blasting

Work with asbestos

Work with plant protection products and other repellents

Work in environments affected by biological risk factors belonging to hazard divisions 3 and 4

Work in deep-freeze rooms

Fire-resistant protective clothing

Welding in restricted areas

Pierce-proof aprons

Boning and cutting work

Work with hand knives involving drawing the knife towards the body

Leather aprons

Welding

Forging

Casting

Forearm protection

Boning and cutting

Gloves

Welding

Handling of sharp-edged objects, other than machines where there is a danger of the glove's being caught

Unprotected work with acids and caustic solutions

Metal mesh gloves

Boning and cutting

Regular cutting using a hand knife for production of body of slaughtered animal

Changing the knives of cutting machines

Weatherproof clothing

Work in the open air in rain and cold weather

Reflective clothing

Work where the workers must be clearly visible

Safety belts and harnesses

Work on scaffolding or construction site cradles

Assembly of prefabricated parts during construction

Roof work

Work in hoist carriers

Work on masts

Safety ropes and cables

Work in high crane cabs

Work in high cabs of warehouse stacking and retrieval equipment

Work in high sections of drilling towers

Work in shafts and sewers

Skin protection

Processing of coating materials

Tanning

 

 

 

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